Gerald R. Ford

Gerald R. Ford Review

The "accidental" president whose innate decency and steady hand restored the presidency after its greatest crisis

When Gerald R. Ford entered the White House in August 1974, he inherited a presidency tarnished by the Watergate scandal, the economy was in a recession, the Vietnam War was drawing to a close, and he had taken office without having been elected. Most observers gave him little chance of success, especially after he pardoned Richard Nixon just a month into his presidency, an action that outraged many Americans, but which Ford thought was necessary to move the nation forward.
Many people today think of Ford as a man who stumbled a lot--clumsy on his feet and in politics--but acclaimed historian Douglas Brinkley shows him to be a man of independent thought and conscience, who never allowed party loyalty to prevail over his sense of right and wrong. As a young congressman, he stood up to the isolationists in the Republican leadership, promoting a vigorous role for America in the world. Later, as House minority leader and as president, he challenged the right wing of his party, refusing to bend to their vision of confrontation with the Communist world. And after the fall of Saigon, Ford also overruled his advisers by allowing Vietnamese refugees to enter the United States, arguing that to do so was the humane thing to do.
Brinkley draws on exclusive interviews with Ford and on previously unpublished documents (including a remarkable correspondence between Ford and Nixon stretching over four decades), fashioning a masterful reassessment of Gerald R. Ford's presidency and his underappreciated legacy to the nation.

Title:Gerald R. Ford
Edition Language:English

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    Gerald R. Ford Reviews

  • Steve

    https://bestpresidentialbios.com/2018...Published in 2007, “Gerald R. Ford” is Douglas Brinkley’s contribution to The American Presidents Series. Brinkley is a professor of history at Rice Unive...

  • Robin Friedman

    A Ford, Not A LincolnWhen he was sworn in as vice president on December 6, 1973, Gerald Ford said in his acceptance speech to the nation: "I am a Ford, not a Lincoln. But I am definitely not a Model T...

  • Shawn Thrasher

    This is the third president sketch I've read in The American Presidents series; I decided I would read Nixon and then Ford so see how they flowed one into the other. If the essence of Elizabeth Drew's...

  • Doreen Petersen

    As a person Ford may have been a wonderful man but as a president it was like he was just treading water....

  • Christopher Litsinger

    Surprisingly good for a "The American Presidents" book, Brinkley covers Ford's political career in reasonable detail; although perhaps with a few too many football metaphors.Brinkley makes the case th...

  • Lee

    The American Presidents look at the only man not elected to the Presidency or Vice Presidency. Follows the career of Gerald Ford as a Congressman, his serving on the Warren Commission. How he was chos...

  • Jay Atwood

    I've read several of the books in this series (Buchanan, Lincoln, Garfield, Arthur, McKinley, Truman, etc.) and they all strike me as fair-minded overviews of the given US President. Make no mistake, ...

  • Timothy T. Pratt

    An excellent readI learned a lot about Gerald Ford that I didn't know and now understand the challenges he faced with Watergate and why ultimately he made the right decision with Nixon. ...

  • Alex

    Loved it. Quick read and full of goodness on every page....

  • Zach Koenig

    After the disastrous Watergate scandal that sullied the Nixon Administration, the nation needed a President who was beyond reproach in order to win back people's trust in government. By and large, Ger...