The Death of Caesar: The Story of History's Most Famous Assassination

The Death of Caesar: The Story of History's Most Famous Assassination Review

Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in the Roman Senate on 3/15/44 BC—the Ides of March according to the Roman calendar. He was the last casualty of one civil war, the first casualty of the next, which would end the Roman Republic, inaugurating the Empire.

Why was Caesar killed? For political reasons, mainly. The conspirators wanted to return Rome to the days when the Senate ruled, but Caesar hoped to pass along his new powers to his family, especially Octavian. The principal plotters were Brutus, Cassius (former allies of Pompey) & Decimus. The killers left the body in the Senate & Caesar’s allies held a public funeral. Mark Antony made a brilliant inflammatory speech that caused a riot. The conspirators fled Rome. Brutus & Cassius raised an army in Greece. Antony & Octavian defeated them.

Title:The Death of Caesar: The Story of History's Most Famous Assassination

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    The Death of Caesar: The Story of History's Most Famous Assassination Reviews

  • Louise

    It seems that this must have been done before. There must be an earlier book focusing on this event for the general reader. If this is the first, and to my knowledge it is, thank you Barry Strauss for...

  • Susan

    This book begins seven months before the Ides of March, in 45 BC, with Caesar planning to enter Rome in triumph to declare the end of the Civil War. Three men were beside him at that time: Decimus Jun...

  • Marla

    Very interesting book. I liked having it as an audiobook. Didn't really know much about what happened to Julius Caesar....

  • Jane

    Very readable synopsis of the world's most famous assassination, written for the educated layperson. First part: background information on Caesar, his career, personality and many people whose lives ...

  • Jerome

    A vivid, almost cinematic history of Caesar’s assassination and the months leading up to it. Strauss begins with the triumph following Caesar’s last campaign and ends with the suicide of Mark Anto...

  • Jean

    On March 15, 44 B.C., Julius Caesar fell to the knives of Brutus, Cassius and perhaps 21 other senators. Strauss’s book covers only a three year span of time. Starting the year before the ides of Ma...

  • Nicky

    I was interested to read The Death of Caesar, since I’d read Barry Strauss’ work before — his book on Spartacus, for one, and the one on the Trojan War. I was less impressed with this one — it...

  • Angel Hatfield

    This book is the true story of the great Roman General Julius Caesar and the day he died. It goes into detail the different people that were his rivals, his betrayals, as well as his allies. It culmi...

  • Peter (Pete) Mcloughlin

    The Ides of March still echoes in our culture over 2000 years later. The first century b.c.e. and the first century c.e. are the most well documented period of Roman history yet there are clouds of un...

  • Liz

    This is an excellent book for those who (like me) really love ancient Roman history. I took four years of Latin in high school, translating the works of Cicero and of course, Julius Caesar. For those ...